yahoo wireless tech news

Trump lists familiar White House faces as possible Bolton successors

Trump lists familiar White House faces as possible Bolton successorsU.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday listed five possible replacements for recently fired national security adviser John Bolton, most of whom are already familiar faces from within his administration. The national security adviser provides advice to the president on defense, security and diplomatic issues. The job, the highest White House position on national security, does not require confirmation by the U.S. Senate.


California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment Surgeries

California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment SurgeriesCalifornia added an eleventh state to its travel blacklist on Friday, banning state-sponsored travel to Iowa over that state's refusal to cover gender-transition surgeries under its Medicaid program.California attorney general Xavier Becerra announced the decision to add Iowa to the travel-ban list, which takes effect October 4 and means public employees and college students will not be able to travel to Iowa on the taxpayer's dime.In May, Iowa governor Kim Reynolds signed a law blocking Medicaid from paying for gender-reassignment surgeries despite the state Supreme Court's ruling earlier this year in favor of charging taxpayers for the procedures. Gender identity is a protected characteristic under Iowa's Civil Rights Act."The Iowa Legislature has reversed course on what was settled law under the Iowa Civil Rights Act, repealing protections for those seeking gender-affirming healthcare," Becerra said in a statement. "California has taken an unambiguous stand against discrimination and government actions that would enable it."California's travel blacklist stems from a 2016 law allowing the Golden State to ban state travel to other U.S. states that roll back protections for LGBT citizens. Texas, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Kentucky are also on the list.


20 dead as truck falls off cliff in southern Philippines

20 dead as truck falls off cliff in southern PhilippinesTwenty villagers were killed and 14 others were injured when the truck they were riding in lost control and fell off a cliff Tuesday in a remote mountain village in the southern Philippines, police and the Red Cross said. Provincial police chief Joel Limson said the truck was negotiating a downhill road in Tboli town in South Cotabato province when its brakes apparently failed and plummeted down a ravine, pinning 15 people to death. Police, Red Cross volunteers and villagers retrieved the 15 bodies from the wreckage at the bottom of the ravine.


French boy, 10, dies 8 years after supermarket burger poisoning

French boy, 10, dies 8 years after supermarket burger poisoningA French boy aged 10, who fell gravely ill in 2011 after consuming a beef burger from supermarket discounter Lidl that was infected with E.coli bacteria, has died of complications stemming from his poisoning, the family's lawyer said. The boy, Nolan, died on Saturday "as a consequence of his poisoning", the family's lawyer Florence Rault told AFP on Sunday. Rault said that Nolan had not "ceased to suffer" after consuming the burger in June 2011.


The U.S. Army's Next Generation of Super Weapons Are Coming

The U.S. Army's Next Generation of Super Weapons Are ComingAnd Iran, North Korea, Russia and China should be very afraid.


'A war zone': Propane explosion kills firefighter, injures 8 others, levels building in Maine

'A war zone': Propane explosion kills firefighter, injures 8 others, levels building in MaineA firefighter was killed and eight others were injured when a powerful propane explosion destroyed a new building Monday in Farmington, Maine.


Couple reveal they are raising child 'gender neutral' and haven't even told close family their baby's sex

Couple reveal they are raising child 'gender neutral' and haven't even told close family their baby's sexA couple have decided to keep their baby’s sex a secret from close relatives in a bid to avoid gender bias.  Hobbit Humphrey, 38, and Jake England-Johns, 35, refer to their 17-month-old child, Anoush, with the pronoun, "they", and dress them in both girls' and boys' clothing. The married couple, who are members of the climate action group, Extinction Rebellion, have been accused of “virtue signalling”. However, they are keen to let their child, Anoush, choose their own gender identity when they are old enough, because they wish for them to “grow into their own person”.  Close family members have not been told the child’s sex and grandmother, Camille, only found out when she changed a nappy.   The couple, who live on a houseboat in  Keynsham, Somerset, discussed the ways in which they could challenge gender bias after discovering Ms Humphrey was pregnant.  Mr England-Johns told the BBC’s Inside Out: “The neutral in gender neutral refers to us trying to behave neutrally towards our child rather than trying to make them neutral.”  “Eventually, we decided that we wouldn’t tell people whether they were a boy or a girl … in order to create this little bubble for our baby to be who they are,” Ms Humphrey said.  However their decision has sparked some controversy. Rosa Freedman, Professor of law conflict and global development at the University of Reading, said: “While this is an individual case the worry would be that in the unlikely event many parents took up this way of parenting, that the NHS,  government, and service providers would not know what to plan for in the future as they would not know how many boys or girls exist.” “Parents concerned about gendered social construct would do better to fight patriarchy, homophobia and transphobia rather and try to virtue signal to their friends and communities so they can get praise.” The couple have said that the reaction to their decision has been mixed. However Mr England-Johns said: “But over a year in, it’s clear that we are serious and gradually people have got used to it.  “Although, that still doesn’t stop some pretty confused looks from old ladies in the park when they come up to us and ask if they’re a boy or a girl. It can take a bit of explaining. “We are quite good now at holding space for people’s discomfort in us going, ‘Oh well, actually we don’t tell anyone, we’re not telling anyone for now.”


Hong Kong Protesters Battle Police, Set Fire to Key Subway Station

Hong Kong Protesters Battle Police, Set Fire to Key Subway Station(Bloomberg) -- It was just a typical weekend in Hong Kong: tear gas, water cannons, petrol bombs and few signs that protests now in their fourth month would fizzle out anytime soon.Both demonstrators and police on Sunday appeared to get more aggressive earlier on than during the previous 14 weekends of protests. Demonstrators set fire to entrances to Wan Chai subway station, while others threw petrol bombs at the central government headquarters in Admiralty. Stations including Tin Hau and Causeway Bay were also damaged.Riot police used tear gas, water cannons, blue dye and pepper spray to clear the crowds. The violent scenes disrupted traffic and prompted major shops to close, including the Sogo department store in the Causeway Bay shopping district. Separately, police broke up fights between demonstrators and white-shirted residents who used chairs and umbrellas as weapons. An opposition lawmaker was arrested. The city had largely returned to normal by Monday’s morning commute, with Wan Chai and Admiralty stations reopened.The tens of thousands of people on the streets chanting “Five Demands, Not One Less” showed that leader Carrie Lam’s move to withdraw a bill allowing extraditions to China hasn’t been enough to end the now-ubiquitous scenes of violence in Hong Kong. And they may only get more intense in the run-up to Oct. 1, when China celebrates 70 years of Communist Party rule.Police said in an early Monday statement that at about 5:45 p.m. on Sunday, some 20 “radical” protesters attacked two officers and threw various petrol bombs at them near the junction of Gloucester Road and Marsh Road in Wan Chai, seriously threatening the safety of the police officers. It said the police officers “withdrew pistols as a warning to disperse them.” Police officials said at a daily afternoon briefing Monday that the officers had shown restraint by drawing their weapons and not firing. They said they made 89 arrests between Friday and Sunday, bringing the total number of protesters arrested to 1,453 since the movement began on June 9. “The momentum for this protest activity is still going,” said Peter, a 30-year-old who joined the protests and declined to give his surname. “We are asking for five demands, not one less.”How Hong Kong’s Sky-High Home Prices Feed the Unrest: QuickTakeMore DemandsRemaining demands include an independent investigation into police’s use of force; an end to using the term “riot” to describe the protesters; an amnesty for those charged during previous demonstrations; and the ability to pick and vote on their leaders. Ted Hui, an opposition lawmaker, was arrested, NOW TV reported.The protracted political chaos is taking a toll on Hong Kong’s economy. The international airport handled 6 million passengers in August, down 12.4% from a year earlier, according to figures published by the Airport Authority on Sunday. It noted the decline was mainly due to lower visitor numbers, particularly a “significant” fall in passenger traffic to and from mainland China, Southeast Asia and Taiwan.Authorities plan to boost annual spending on public construction to more than HK$100 billion ($12.8 billion) over the next few years, up from HK$80 billion, the city’s Financial Secretary Paul Chan wrote in a blog post Sunday. Projects will include developing public housing, hospitals and new towns, he said.The Civil Human Rights Front, which organized some of the city’s biggest mass rallies earlier this summer, had canceled a plan to march through the city center after authorities upheld their ban on the gathering. Police cited violence around previous protests, saying the route was too close to “high-risk buildings,” including government offices and subway stations.Hong Kong Leaders Grow More Frustrated by Leaderless ProtestersTens of thousands of protesters came out anyway, including hundreds who gathered outside the British Consulate earlier in the day chanting “God Save the Queen” and urging the U.K. government to ensure China honors its commitments to its former colony.Police on Sunday warned those who came out in spite of the ban to stop immediately, with a series of tweets saying the gathering was illegal and saying “radical protesters” were committing “destructive acts.” The government said law enforcement officers took steps to disperse the crowds and made arrests “in a resolute manner.”It was difficult to compare total crowd sizes with previous protests, as the police don’t issue estimates for unauthorized gatherings. In one piece of good news for the government, a planned “stress test” of the airport transport network on Saturday struggled to gain traction.“It’s quite risky for us to go to the airport because it’s a separate island and the police could stop us at the bridge and not allow us to go through, or they can arrest all of us,” said Aidon, 18, who declined to give his last name. “It’s not because we lose momentum -- it’s more about tactics.”(Updates with police briefing in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alfred Liu, Linus Chua, Deena Shanker, Adrian Kennedy and Natalie Lung.To contact the reporters on this story: Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.net;Chloe Whiteaker in Hong Kong at cwhiteaker@bloomberg.net;Justin Chin in Hong Kong at hchin15@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Belgian F-16s scrambled to intercept 2 Russian nuclear-capable supersonic bombers over the Baltic Sea

Belgian F-16s scrambled to intercept 2 Russian nuclear-capable supersonic bombers over the Baltic SeaThe Belgian Air Force intercepted two Russian Tu-160 supersonic, nuclear-capable bombers at close range in Baltic airspace.


UPDATE 1-Russia detains two N.Korean vessels after one opens fire - reports

UPDATE 1-Russia detains two N.Korean vessels after one opens fire - reportsRussian border guards have detained two North Korean boats in Russian territorial waters in the Sea of Japan after one of them attacked a Russian patrol, local media cited the Federal Security Service (FSB) as saying on Tuesday. A Russian border patrol discovered two North Korean schooners and 11 motorboats fishing illegally off its far eastern coast and detained the first vessel, prompting the second one to open fire, the FSB was quoted as saying. Three Russian border guards were wounded in the incident.


Best Bar Tools for Your Home Bar

Best Bar Tools for Your Home Bar


Wisconsin man accused of making THC cartridges charged

Wisconsin man accused of making THC cartridges chargedA Wisconsin man suspected of running an illegal operation to manufacture vaping cartridges flew to California last month to get THC oil in bulk to fill thousands of cartridges to sell, prosecutors said Monday in charging documents. Authorities in Kenosha, Wisconsin, arrested 20-year-old Tyler Huffhines on Sept. 5 after parents tipped off police when they saw their teenage son with one of the cartridges. Prosecutors say Huffhines employed 10 people to fill the cartridges with THC oil at a condo he rented with a stolen identity.


South Korea drops Japan from 'white list' in trade row

South Korea drops Japan from 'white list' in trade rowSouth Korea Wednesday officially dropped Japan from its "white list" of trusted trade partners, the latest move in a bitter row stemming from Tokyo's use of forced labour during World War II. Seoul had already warned Tokyo it would reciprocate following a similar move by Japan in late August to downgrade South Korea's trade status. Local companies shipping strategic goods to Japan would now have to submit more documents and approval would take around 15 days instead of five, Yonhap news agency reported, quoting the South Korean trade ministry.


What Were the Mach 10 UFOs That Iran's Jets Encountered?

What Were the Mach 10 UFOs That Iran's Jets Encountered?Does the U.S. have a super-secret spy plane?


Video shows burglars kick in California family's front door, before being scared away

Video shows burglars kick in California family's front door, before being scared awayTwo masked-man kicked in the front door of a Pleasanton home in an attempted home-invasion -- and it was all caught on surveillance video.


Triple threat: Tropical Storm Imelda swamps Texas, Humberto nears Bermuda and TD 10 forms in Atlantic

Triple threat: Tropical Storm Imelda swamps Texas, Humberto nears Bermuda and TD 10 forms in AtlanticWhile Hurricane Humberto nears Bermuda, there's flooding in Texas due to Tropical Storm Imelda, and Tropical Depression 10 is spinning up in the Atlantic


Afghan president narrowly avoids Taliban bomb in worst violence since collapse of US negotiations

Afghan president narrowly avoids Taliban bomb in worst violence since collapse of US negotiationsTaliban suicide bombers killed at least 48 people and wounded dozens more in two blasts Tuesday - one at a campaign rally for the president and the other in Kabul - with the insurgents warning of more violence ahead of elections. The first attack saw a motorcyclist detonate a suicide bomb at a checkpoint leading to a rally where Ashraf Ghani, the president, was addressing supporters in central Parwan province, just north of the capital, killing 26 and wounding 42. Just over an hour later another blast also claimed by the Taliban rocked central Kabul near the US embassy. Authorities initially did not give casualty figures, but later said 22 people had been killed and a further 38 wounded. The explosions came after Donald Trump, the US president, abruptly ended talks with the Taliban earlier this month over a deal that would have allowed the US to begin withdrawing troops from its longest war. One of the bombs was detonated near the US Embassy in Kabul Credit: AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi In a statement sent to media claiming responsibility for both blasts, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said the attack near Mr Ghani's rally was deliberately aimed at disrupting the September 28 elections. "We already warned people not to attend election rallies, if they suffer any losses that is their own responsibility," the statement said. An image from the scene near Mr Ghani's rally, roughly an hour's drive north of Kabul, showed the remains of a burnt motorcycle, with a body on top, covered by a blanket and next to a badly damaged police car. Taliban control in Afghanistan Women and children were among the causalities, Parwan hospital director Abdul Qasim Sangin said. The president, who was speaking to his supporters at the time of the blast, was unhurt but later condemned the attack, saying the incident proved the Taliban had no real interest in reconciliation. "As the Taliban continue their crimes, they once again prove that they are not interested in peace and stability in Afghanistan," said Mr Ghani in a statement.


A flight in India was delayed when a swarm of angry bees covered the cockpit window and attacked staff who tried to remove them

A flight in India was delayed when a swarm of angry bees covered the cockpit window and attacked staff who tried to remove themFirefighters were eventually brought in to get the plane, with 135 passengers and Bangladesh's information minister on board, to take off.


NYC to Allow 1.1 Million Students to Skip Class for Climate Protests

NYC to Allow 1.1 Million Students to Skip Class for Climate ProtestsNew York City public schools will allow 1.1 million students  to skip classes Friday in order to attend the planned "climate strike" ahead of the United Nations Climate Action Summit.The protests aim to press the Summit for immediate action to stop climate change, and are geared specifically for the participation of young people.Reactions to the decision have been ecstatic in some cases, as protest organizers contemplate what they hope will be the largest climate change protest in the history of the U.S.“This completely changes things, and it’s our doing,” Xiye Bastida, 17, a senior at Beacon High School in Manhattan, told the New York Times. Some teachers at her school were planning to accompany students to the protests even before the school district granted permission to do so.“We’re not against the school system,” she said. “We need the schools to work with us because our larger goal is to stop the fossil fuel industry.”


Surprising Facts You Didn't Know About Rhinos

Surprising Facts You Didn't Know About Rhinos


California GOP congressman won't seek re-election

California GOP congressman won't seek re-electionA Republican congressman in California said Tuesday he won't run for re-election next year, making him the 18th GOP incumbent to bow out of the U.S. House of Representatives now that the party is in the minority. U.S. Rep. Paul Cook announced he will instead run for a seat on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors in 2020. California has 53 U.S. House seats, the most of any state.


US Fed signals rate cut as market odds fluctuate

US Fed signals rate cut as market odds fluctuateExpectations are high for the US Federal Reserve to deliver the year's second interest rate cut on Wednesday as members conclude a hotly-anticipated policy meeting in Washington. With the meeting underway, central bank officials on Tuesday also moved for the first time in a decade to prevent market fluctuations from pushing short-term interest rates beyond the Fed's control. US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has sent strong signals in recent weeks that a rate cut is coming, vowing that policymakers stand ready to "act as appropriate" amid "significant risks" to the economy -- notably President Donald Trump's trade wars.


Houthis Have an Arsenal of Ballistic and Cruise Missiles (Some from North Korea)

Houthis Have an Arsenal of Ballistic and Cruise Missiles (Some from North Korea)Know this: The Houthis inherited from the defunct Yemeni military a large number of Soviet-exported Scuds as well as North Korean-made Scuds called “Hwasong-6s.


GM stops paying for health insurance for striking union workers; talks continue

GM stops paying for health insurance for striking union workers; talks continueGeneral Motors Co shifted health insurance costs for its striking workers to the United Auto Workers union as its members walked the picket line for the second day on Tuesday. The UAW on Monday launched the first company-wide strike at GM in 12 years, saying negotiations toward a new national agreement covering about 48,000 hourly workers had hit an impasse. This year's talks between the union and GM, Ford Motor Co and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV (FCA) were expected to be tough, with thorny issues such as healthcare costs, profit-sharing and the use of temporary workers on the table.


Wisconsin brothers charged with operating counterfeit vaping cartridge operation

Wisconsin brothers charged with operating counterfeit vaping cartridge operationTyler and Jacob Huffhines ran an operation that cranked out 3,000 to 5,000 counterfeit vaping cartridges each day, authorities say.


Investigation into alleged surveillance abuse and targeting of the Trump campaign is in its final stages

Investigation into alleged surveillance abuse and targeting of the Trump campaign is in its final stagesInspector general Michael E. Horowitz outlined a multi-step review process with FBI Director Christopher Wray and Attorney General William Barr; chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge reports from Washington.


A flight from Vietnam to South Korea was delayed for 11 hours after the pilot arrived at the airport and realized he had lost his passport

A flight from Vietnam to South Korea was delayed for 11 hours after the pilot arrived at the airport and realized he had lost his passportT'Way Air said it was investigating the incident and how the pilot lost his passport, and that it put passengers in a hotel and fed them breakfast.


Exclusive: Russia carried out a 'stunning' breach of FBI communications system, escalating the spy game on U.S. soil

Exclusive: Russia carried out a 'stunning' breach of FBI communications system, escalating the spy game on U.S. soilRussian compounds and diplomats in the U.S. played key roles in a counterintelligence operation that stretched from the Bay Area to the nation’s capital, according to former U.S. officials.


Book Review: Justice Neil Gorsuch’s A Republic, If You Can Keep It

Book Review: Justice Neil Gorsuch’s A Republic, If You Can Keep ItJust over 30 years ago, President Ronald Reagan nominated a former Yale law professor, then serving as a D.C. Circuit judge, to the Supreme Court. His views on the meaning of the Constitution were considered by some of the political class to be iniquitous. The nominee’s constructive criticism of the mainstream of legal analysis was its failure to show allegiance to the actual language of the Constitution. “I don’t think the Constitution is studied almost anywhere, including law schools. In law schools, what they study is what the court said about the Constitution. They study the opinions. They don’t study the Constitution itself.”Of course, the nominee was Robert Bork. His view that the Constitution had an ageless meaning was cruelly savaged by Senator Ted Kennedy. “Robert Bork’s America is a land in which women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks would sit at segregated lunch counters, rogue police could break down citizens’ doors in midnight raids,” and other shameful regressions would exist. Critics condemned Bork’s view that the words in the Constitution mean now what they meant when written in 1787. No living, breathing, mutating Constitution for Bork. At his death in 2012, some labeled him the “original originalist.”The Senate rejected Bork’s nomination, but his approach to constitutional interpretation has thrived — though by no means has it conquered. Justice Neil Gorsuch in his new book explains and vigorously promotes originalism. The significance of that form of analysis is indicated by the title he chose for his book: A Republic, If You Can Keep It. Those were the words of Benjamin Franklin in explaining what the Constitutional Convention had created. The centrality of originalism to the survival of the Republic, Gorsuch writes, arises from separation of powers. If judges abandon their constitutional role of simply interpreting (though often it is not so simple) what the political branches have done, they are assuming the roles that the other branches are to perform.Gorsuch says the book is for the general citizenry, not academics. He wants to revive and encourage “interest in the Constitution of the framers’ design and the judge’s role in it.” Even with that goal, the author gives those who are knowledgeable, imperfectly so like this subordinate federal judge, a lot to ponder. A significant part of Gorsuch’s book reprints speeches, court opinions, and other prior writings. Much new is interspersed, though.This is not a memoir. Readers who want the details of his selection and confirmation for the Supreme Court will not be sated. One’s appetite is whetted at the beginning of the book, when Gorsuch discusses receiving the White House call, being interviewed, and being announced. Then the book’s final chapter, as the author previews it, “collects some of the statements I made during and shortly after the nomination and confirmation process.” That’s it. Justice Gorsuch may have decided that persuasively presenting his principles about the judicial role was both more appropriate and more important than recounting a recent political battle. Clarence Thomas is the one current justice who has written extensively about his confirmation controversies, but he waited 17 years to publish. As a personal aside, I too wrote about the pains and sufferings of a difficult confirmation, mine merely for a circuit court.  I waited six years until the wounds had (mainly) healed.There is just a little about his personal background. What is recounted can be charming. Gorsuch quickly describes several ancestors, including a grandfather in Denver who was a trolley-car driver, then a lawyer. This is the ancestor who had an awful voice but enjoyed using it to sing — loudly. A grandmother’s family built a small hotel near a railroad depot in Wyoming, which still stands and is used by the current generation during visits to the area.Mom and Dad were both lawyers, though the father little enjoyed being one. What he passed on to his son was a love of the outdoors, of camping, hunting, and skiing, but of fishing most of all. Gorsuch’s mother graduated from college at age 19 and from law school at 22. She became the first female assistant district attorney in Denver, and later was a state legislator. Gorsuch’s wife is a native of England. He gives a brief description of her background and their meeting while he was studying for a doctorate in England.  She agreed to marry him and move to Colorado, then fell in love with the West.Introduced to fishing by his father, Gorsuch has considerable knowledge of its mysteries. He recounts an amusing episode with a possibly novice fly-fisherman, Justice Antonin Scalia. There was no calm casting of lures for Scalia during a visit to Colorado — “he would storm over in his waders” to a spot Gorsuch thought was promising, surely scaring any fish. An affecting photo of the two, a Supreme Court justice and his not-yet-successor, is included, neither man in waders but a lake and a boat behind them.In Justice Scalia’s defense, he was an able hunter. The head of an elk he named Leroy which once adorned his chambers is now on the wall in Justice Gorsuch’s.The book is divided into only seven chapters. Within most of them are previous writings by the author, including lengthy excerpts from judicial opinions. He analyzes the importance of separation of powers in one chapter and of originalism and textualism in another. A chapter on the “Art of Judging” focuses on the need for courage to strive for the correct result and not the comfortable, easy one. He argues that good intentions have led to the worst Supreme Court decisions, such as Dred Scott, which found constitutional protection for slavery in 1857, and Korematsu, which in 1944 found no constitutional barrier to imprisoning American citizens during wartime if their country of origin, Japan, had started a war with the United States. He argues convincingly that the two decisions resulted from the Supreme Court’s seeking what appeared to be the best policy results at the time, as opposed to applying the plain language of the Constitution.It is an optimistic book, urging the avoidance of cynicism and promoting reasonable discourse on the issues that divide us. One way he has literally taught such perspectives is in a class on ethics at the University of Colorado. He asks, over at least the silent groans of many students, that they write their own obituary. Their written responses often show they are receiving what he is trying to give them, which is an understanding that what most of us, on reflection, will want to be remembered for are such things as kindness, love of family, a contribution to the world around us.Gorsuch’s writing style is conversational, as are many of his court opinions. He leavens his descriptions of legal debates with asides such as, after admitting that letting courts update the Constitution to reach the best results was not “completely insane,” saying that many things might not be insane but are still ill-advised — a point he often makes to his teenage daughters.In addition to using originalism to interpret the Constitution, Gorsuch promotes adoption of its close relative, textualism, to interpret statutes. Both approaches rely on the words of the relevant text as they would have been understood at the time of their creation. He acknowledges that these tools do not always provide a clear answer. Revising a Churchill quote about democracy as a form of government, he says that at the very least, originalism “is the worst form of constitutional interpretation, except for all the others.” It provides considerable determinacy; as much as humanly possible, it leaves out of judicial analysis the policy desires of judges; it allows the compromises inherent in our form of government to be upheld — Congress decides what statutes are to do, and the difficult method to amend the Constitution remains the only way revisions are made. The fact that judges are largely expected to wander free of such texts was recently, and startlingly, made apparent to me when an attorney in his oral argument stated dismissively that the only thing the other side had to support its position was the statute, while his side had the case law.Those whom the justice most admires are identified along the way. Justices Byron White and Anthony Kennedy, for whom Gorsuch clerked, are among them. A long-ago Tenth Circuit judge, Alfred Murrah, is another, highlighted for his tireless work ethic and as a representative of the people who toil quietly in the service of country. Also receiving considerable praise are such historic figures as George Washington, John Adams, James Madison, and Theodore Roosevelt. Gorsuch quotes the segment of TR’s speech about credit belonging not to the critic but to the person in the arena, with “face marred by dust and sweat and blood,” who, through defeat or victory, is not to be found among the “cold and timid souls.” By praising both the tireless Judge Murrah and this part of TR’s legacy, Gorsuch is urging his citizen audience to strive mightily, and as he emphasizes, also calmly and respectfully, to preserve this Republic.Three years after his confirmation defeat, Robert Bork wrote a book detailing his disagreements with the direction of the Supreme Court and explaining the benefits of originalism, closing with a lengthy narrative of his blocked path to the Court. Fortunately for Gorsuch and for the nomination process more generally, his selection was not met with the hyperbolic condemnation that Bork’s invoked. His book about originalism comes two years after his confirmation victory. Justice Gorsuch has written a temperate book, with civility shown to all. Such fairness, though, does not reduce the fervor with which he urges that we keep this country a republic.


The Latest: Netanyahu says he'll seek 'Zionist' government

The Latest: Netanyahu says he'll seek 'Zionist' governmentAfter an apparent election setback, Israel's prime minister says he will seek the formation of a new "Zionist" government that excludes Arab parties. Benjamin Netanyahu addressed a small crowd of supporters in Tel Aviv at 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, more than five hours after voting ended. Initial exit polls placed challenger Benny Gantz's Blue and White party just ahead of Netanyahu's Likud, hurting Netanyahu's chances of remaining as prime minister.


Earth to warm more quickly, new climate models show

Earth to warm more quickly, new climate models showGreenhouse gases thrust into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels are warming Earth's surface more quickly than previously understood, according to new climate models set to replace those used in current UN projections, scientists said Tuesday. The new calculations also suggest the Paris Agreement goals of capping global warming at "well below" two degrees, and 1.5C if possible, will be harder to reach, the scientists said. "With our two models, we see that the scenario known as SSP1 2.6 -- which normally allows us to stay under 2C -- doesn't quite get us there," Olivier Boucher, head of the Institute Pierre Simon Laplace Climate Modelling Centre in Paris, told AFP.


See This A-10 Warthog? It Could Wipe Out Iran's Swarm Boats in a War

See This A-10 Warthog? It Could Wipe Out Iran's Swarm Boats in a WarAt least that is the plan.


Canadian Mom Who Allegedly Bought Son’s Way Into UCLA Arrested in ‘Varsity Blues’ Scandal

Canadian Mom Who Allegedly Bought Son’s Way Into UCLA Arrested in ‘Varsity Blues’ ScandalREUTERS/Lucy NicholsonA Canadian mother who allegedly bought her son’s way into the University of California, Los Angeles, was arrested on Monday night in Spain, making her the 52nd defendant charged in the sprawling college-admissions scandal that earned actress Felicity Huffman a prison sentence last week.Xiaoning Sui, 48, of Surrey, British Columbia, Canada, was charged with one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud, according to an indictment that was unsealed on Tuesday in Boston federal court. Sui’s alleged crimes were first reported by the Los Angeles Times last month.Sui is one of dozens of parents accused of paying Rick Singer—a former private college-admissions consultant and the ringleader of the nation’s largest-ever college cheating and bribery scheme—to facilitate her son’s entry into an elite school.Sui allegedly wired Singer $400,000 to gain her son admission at UCLA as a fake soccer recruit. Other parents have been accused of paying their children’s way into Yale, Stanford, and the University of Southern California, among other elite schools.Felicity Huffman, Full House star Lori Loughlin, and dozens of other prominent parents were arrested in March 2019 over their alleged involvement in the scheme, dubbed “Operation Varsity Blues” by the FBI. Huffman on Friday became the first of 34 charged parents to be sentenced in the case. A federal judge ordered her to spend 14 days in prison, pay a $30,000 fine, serve one year of probation, and volunteer 250 hours of community service after she pleaded guilty in May to paying a Harvard graduate $15,000 to correct her eldest daughter Sophia’s answers on the SAT. The bribe secured Sophia a 400-point bump on the college entrance exam and, ironically, tanked the 19-year-old’s chances of getting into her dream school.Singer told Sui in August 2018 that her son could be “guaranteed” admission to UCLA in exchange for $400,000, according to the indictment. He has pleaded guilty to fraud, racketeering, money laundering, and obstruction.Laura Janke, a former University of Southern California soccer coach who also pleaded guilty to racketeering charges in May, then allegedly created a fake soccer profile for Sui’s son, which “described him as a top player for two private soccer clubs in Canada,” according to a Department of Justice press release.Once the profile was fabricated, Sui allegedly wired money to Singer’s sham charity organization, Key Worldwide Foundation, and Sui’s son was admitted to UCLA a few weeks later as a recruited soccer player on a 25-percent scholarship.Sui faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison on the charge of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. She is being held in Spain until authorities can seek her extradition to Boston on the charges.Felicity Huffman Gets Prison Time in College Admissions ScandalFelicity Huffman Deserves Every Day in Jail She’s GettingRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Putin Loses Legendary Approval-Rating Crown to His New Neighbor

Putin Loses Legendary Approval-Rating Crown to His New Neighbor(Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Vladimir Putin takes great pride in his sky-high approval rating. But with Muscovites rising up and a new government instilling hope in Ukraine, he’s being outshone by the president next door, Volodymyr Zelenskiy.It’s still early days for the administration in Kyiv. While pushing a raft of popular reforms, Zelenskiy, 41, remains in his honeymoon period, while cries he’s too close to a local billionaire grow louder.The 66-year-old Putin, meanwhile, is approaching two decades as Russia’s leader. Economic expansion has fizzled out, and along with it the spending largess that kept the masses happy.The last time his popularity sagged meaningfully, Putin famously got a boost after annexing Crimea from Ukraine and fomenting a war between the two former allies.Zelenskiy has a long way to go to match the 89% rating Putin reached back then.To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Langley in London at alangley1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andrea Dudik at adudik@bloomberg.net, Gregory L. WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Blaming shelters and street sleeping, Donald Trump blasts California for homeless crisis

Blaming shelters and street sleeping, Donald Trump blasts California for homeless crisisDonald Trump hands out a conservative prescription to remedy homelessness, blaming shelters and calling for cities to ban sleeping on streets.


Fall-Flavored Cocktails, From Pecan Pie Martinis to Pumpkin Pie Sangria

Fall-Flavored Cocktails, From Pecan Pie Martinis to Pumpkin Pie Sangria


UPDATE 1-U.N. Security Council overcomes Chinese veto threat to renew Afghanistan mission

UPDATE 1-U.N. Security Council overcomes Chinese veto threat to renew Afghanistan missionThe United Nations Security Council unanimously agreed on Tuesday to extend a U.N. political mission in Afghanistan after last-minute talks overcame a Chinese threat to veto if there was no reference to Beijing's global Belt and Road infrastructure project. "To our regret a few countries refused to keep the text of consensus previously agreed," said China's U.N. Ambassador Zhang Jun, describing the adopted resolution as a technical rollover. The resolutions mandating the mission in 2016, 2017 and 2018 all included a reference welcoming and urging efforts like China's Belt and Road initiative to facilitate trade and transit, but in March the United States and some other council members said they could no longer accept that language.


Boy Scout leader sang naked in front of kids, and organization failed to investigate: Lawsuit

Boy Scout leader sang naked in front of kids, and organization failed to investigate: LawsuitA Boy Scout leader who was accused of singing naked in front of several young boys was not investigated by his troop despite multiple complaints.


House of Ukraine's former top central banker set on fire

House of Ukraine's former top central banker set on fireThe home of Ukraine's former central bank chief has been burned to the ground, the third chilling incident involving the banker over the past few weeks. Police said in a statement Tuesday that they are investigating a suspected arson attack late Monday on the house of Valeria Gontareva outside the capital, Kyiv. Gontareva has said she has received threats from Ukrainian oligarch Ihor Kolomoyskyi, who lost his PrivatBank to a government nationalization that was carried out while Gontareva was at the helm of the central bank in 2016.


US sanctions Italy, Panama and Colombia firms over Venezuela ties

US sanctions Italy, Panama and Colombia firms over Venezuela tiesThe United States on Tuesday imposed sanctions on 16 companies linked to Colombian businessman Alex Nain Saab Moran, an associate of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. The move is the latest US escalation of sanctions targeting the inner circle of Maduro, who is grappling with a political and economic crisis that the United Nations says has left a quarter of Venezuela's 30 million people in need of humanitarian aid.


Is Russia's Crazy Status-6 Nuclear Weapon a Great Idea or a Really Bad One?

Is Russia's Crazy Status-6 Nuclear Weapon a Great Idea or a Really Bad One?Let's take a look.


NC high school cheerleaders on probation after posing with Trump 2020 sign

NC high school cheerleaders on probation after posing with Trump 2020 signA North Carolina high school cheerleading team is on probation after taking a picture in front of a Trump 2020 re-election banner.


Saudi oil production to resume as US officials 'claim attack came from Iran'

Saudi oil production to resume as US officials 'claim attack came from Iran'Saudi Arabia has announced that oil production will be restored to normal by the end of the month, as US officials reportedly claimed that the weekend attack on major facilities in the kingdom, that shocked the world and sent prices soaring, came from Iran.Energy minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said on Tuesday average oil production in September and October would be 9.89m barrels per day and that it would ensure full commitments to its customers this month.


Sheriff indicted for plotting to kill deputy who had tape of his 'racially offensive' remarks

Sheriff indicted for plotting to kill deputy who had tape of his 'racially offensive' remarksA North Carolina sheriff was indicted for obstruction of justice for allegedly plotting to kill one of his deputies.


India Is Dangerously Close to Becoming an Also-Ran

India Is Dangerously Close to Becoming an Also-Ran(Bloomberg Opinion) -- India’s government will shortly find itself at a fork in the road. Will it choose globalization and export-oriented growth? Or will the isolationists in the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party win, and keep India out of a giant Indo-Pacific trading bloc?This weekend, New Delhi hosted negotiators for the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership – from the 10 members of ASEAN as well as Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea and China – in the hope that it could swing last-minute safeguards for some of its producers. Indian officials have stalled RCEP’s progress as much as they could, and the others are now losing patience. One way or another, the deal will have to be concluded by November, when the leaders of the 16 RCEP countries will meet in Bangkok. Malaysia’s Mahathir Mohammed, not a man known for patience, said in June that the other countries could go on without India, if necessary.Many in New Delhi, even within the commerce ministry, would be relieved to see that happen. The belief that India has “lost” in most of its trade agreements is pervasive here. Influential lobbies tied to the country’s laggard producers are happy to remind officials how trade deficits soared with members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations after a free-trade agreement was signed some years ago, for example. And there has always been a strong isolationist wing within the Hindu nationalist BJP – right-wing ideologues don’t just want India out of RCEP; they would prefer existing agreements with Japan, Korea and ASEAN be renegotiated, if not abandoned.Of course, India can only be said to have “lost” if you ignore the considerable gains to consumers from cheaper imports. Once upon a time, Indian households had to worry constantly about high and variable prices of cooking oil. That’s no longer a concern, thanks to imports of palm oil from Indonesia and Malaysia, in spite of the steep duties permitted by the Indo-ASEAN free-trade agreement. And when producers’ lobbies complain about losing market share to Southeast Asia, they merely underline how uncompetitive Indian industry has become.There is, in fact, a far better reason than any of these for India to feel doubtful about RCEP, and it’s geopolitical more than economic. For Beijing, the trading bloc is just another method to ensure that the People’s Republic embeds itself as the hub of Asia’s economic geography. That’s not something anyone in India is comfortable with. India runs a massive trade deficit with China, of course; but, even more than that, officials here are conscious that concluding RCEP in the middle of the Sino-U.S. trade war would be a boost to Beijing. The problem is that all options for New Delhi are unappetizing. If only there was a large and comprehensive alternative to the RCEP that excluded China — but, of course, President Donald Trump has killed the Trans-Pacific Partnership, leaving Beijing in control of the future of Asian trade.In the end, though, it’s hard to see how India would be best served by turning its back on RCEP. In spite of his pro-trade rhetoric at places like Davos, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has started putting up tariff walls in recent years, as early attempts to boost Indian competitiveness failed to show quick enough results. This turn to protectionism needs to be reversed, if India has any hope of employing the millions of young people graduating its schools every year.It’s true that signing a sweeping free-trade agreement would be a significant change in direction for a government that is most comfortable speaking a 1970s-vintage language of import substitution, industrial policy and protective tariffs. But Indian negotiators have already moderated their demands considerably. New Delhi has made it clear that it would be satisfied with a two-track agreement that keeps some walls up against Chinese imports while opening up to the other RCEP countries.I’m still hopeful that, come November, Modi’s signature will be on this agreement. If nothing else, it would be a massive humiliation on the international stage for him to stand aside as all the other leaders of the Indo-Pacific come together to declare a new era is dawning. So much of Modi’s domestic popularity is wrapped around the carefully constructed myth of his international importance, that this might be seen as an unacceptable political hit. At least that’s what we should hope the calculations within New Delhi’s corridors of power are – because, if not, then India is condemned to long decades of being an also-ran on trade and growth.To contact the author of this story: Mihir Sharma at msharma131@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mihir Sharma is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He was a columnist for the Indian Express and the Business Standard, and he is the author of “Restart: The Last Chance for the Indian Economy.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


The High-Risk Strategy That Could Hand Democrats the White House

The High-Risk Strategy That Could Hand Democrats the White HouseDemocratic voters live in clusters — but there's a way to take advantage of that


Bill Gates says he regrets meeting Epstein after his conviction and agreeing to donate $2m to MIT

Bill Gates says he regrets meeting Epstein after his conviction and agreeing to donate $2m to MITBill Gates said he regrets meeting with Jeffrey Epstein and giving a $2 million donation to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) through him after the financier was convicted of sex offences. Mr Gates, who co-founded Microsoft, met with Epstein in 2013, five years after he pleaded guilty to two charges of soliciting a minor for prostitution, and later made an an anonymous donation to MIT's Media Lab. Focus has fallen on the pair's relationships after US media reports suggested Epstein used proxies to make $7.5 million in donations to the prestigious institution after he was removed from MIT's official donor database. It emerged last week that Mr Gates made a $2 million donation to the MIT Media Lab in October 2014, which he requested to be recorded as an anonymous donation.  According to a leaked email seen by the New Yorker, the Media Lab's director, Joi Ito, wrote to a colleague: “This is a $2M gift from Bill Gates directed by Jeffrey Epstein”.  However Mr Gates has denied the donation was made at Epstein's behest, with a spokesperson saying “any claim that Epstein directed any programmatic or personal grant making for Bill Gates is completely false.” Jeffrey Epstein was convicted of sex offences in 2008 Credit: AP And in an interview with Axios this week, Mr Gates expressed regret over his link to Epstein, saying "I wish I hadn't met with him". Mr Gates said Epstein was introduced to him "as somebody who could bring more people into philanthropy". He added: "There were meetings along those lines. That didn't materialise, and so then I stopped meeting with him."   Asked if he felt used by Epstein, Mr Gates said: "I'd say I didn't have a ... business or personal relationship - I wouldn't go that far." MIT's media lab has faced public backlash after it emerged that senior figures in the research laboratory had concealed the extent of its contact and fundraising ties with Epstein.  Shortly after the New Yorker published leaked internal emails, Mr Ito resigned as director of the lab and as an employee of the institution. MIT said it had launched an independent investigations into the lab's alleged links to Epstein.  Yesterday a computer scientist, Richard Stallman, also resigned from MIT after he appeared to suggest having sex with a minor does not constitute assault an in leaked comments about one of Epstein's alleged victims.  An MIT graduate, Selam Jie Gano, shared the emails online in a post calling for Mr Stallman's removal. According to her post, Mr Stallman was discussing Marvin Minsky, a deceased MIT academic, accused of assaulting one of Epstein's alleged victims, Virginia Giuffre. Ms Giuffre has alleged in court documents that Epstein sent her to have sex with Mr Minsky. Mr Stallman argued that Mr Minsky had not actually assaulted her because there is no suggestion that "he applied force or violence". In the emails, the computer scientist said that “the most plausible scenario is that she presented herself to him as entirely willing" while "being coerced by Epstein".  He went on to argue that sexual assault is a "vague" definition and questioned whether it applied to Mr Minsky, before going to say “it is morally absurd to define ‘rape’ in a way that depends on minor details such as which country it was in or whether the victim was 18 years old or 17.” Announcing his immediate resignation, Mr Stallman said the move was down to “pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterisations”.


IS leader calls on fighters to free detained comrades

IS leader calls on fighters to free detained comradesThe leader of the Islamic State group released a new alleged audio recording Monday calling on members of the extremist group to do all they can to free IS detainees and women held in jails and camps. The purported audio by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, in which he also said that his group is carrying out attacks in different countries, was his first public statement since April, when the shadowy leader appeared in a video for the first time in five years. With a $25 million U.S. bounty on his head, al-Baghdadi is the world's most wanted man, responsible for steering his chillingly violent organization into mass slaughter of opponents and directing and inspiring terror attacks across continents and in the heart of Europe.


Mugabe gets low-key farewell in Zimbabwe home village

Mugabe gets low-key farewell in Zimbabwe home villageThe remains of former Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe, who died on September 6, arrived in his home village on Monday for a subdued farewell at a dusty sports field after a weekend state funeral with African leaders in the capital.


Did a Russian-Made Submarine 'Sink' A U.S. Navy Nuclear Attack Sub?

Did a Russian-Made Submarine 'Sink' A U.S. Navy Nuclear Attack Sub?Back in 2015, Indian media claimed that one of New Delhi’s Russian-built Kilo-class diesel-electric attack submarines managed to “sink” a nuclear-powered U.S. Navy Los Angeles-class attack submarine during exercises in October of that year.